1. Introducing my new music project: Scattering Wishes by wel.kins

     
  2. Party like Nobel Laureates: James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman, and Thomas C. Südhof. 2013 winners in Physiology or Medicine.

    Party like Nobel Laureates: James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman, and Thomas C. Südhof. 2013 winners in Physiology or Medicine.

     
  3. "In an era when unnecessary medical services are being intensely examined to reduce costs, similar critical attention should be applied to eliminating waste from medical training, with a goal for U.S. medical education to shorten training by 30 percent by 2020."

     

     medicine  education 

  4. "In a review of over eighty studies on the use of music in therapeutic settings, the pediatrician Kathi Kemper and the psychologist Suzanne Danhauer concluded that music had multiple direct physiological effects: steady rhythms helped regulate breathing and elicited increased activity in the lateral temporal lobe, an area of the brain that helps integrate sensory inputs. In particular, classical music helped improve heart-rate variability, a measure of stress and resilience, while relaxing music led to decreased levels of cortisol, a stress hormone, in a group of students who were engaged in stressful activities. Music had, as well, more indirect effects on both emotion and behavior, making people happier, more relaxed, less anxious, and less overwhelmed."

     

     music  medicine 

  5. Hidden beauty

    HIV

    A photographer and a Johns Hopkins pathologist have joined forces to produce a book called Hidden Beauty where they explore the aesthetics of human disease. Above is a picture of the human immunodeficiency virus, better known as HIV (in red), sprouting from a white blood cell (in blue).

     

     art  medicine 

  6. We are quickly, by evolutionary standards, becoming a mutant species.  

About 5 million people lived on Earth 10,000 years ago. By 2050 there will be more than 9 billion people on our planet. 

This rapid population growth has an interesting genetic fingerprint: each generation of the whole population has about 100 billion mutations. A few of these mutations may be beneficial, helping us adapt to—for example—living in high altitudes. The rest, some believe, can be potentially harmful and are making us prone to illness. 

Our species may be 200,000 years old but studies suggest that the majority of our current genetic variation (single nucleotide mutations) have occurred only in the past 5,000 years. 

(Via Discover)

    We are quickly, by evolutionary standards, becoming a mutant species.

    About 5 million people lived on Earth 10,000 years ago. By 2050 there will be more than 9 billion people on our planet.

    This rapid population growth has an interesting genetic fingerprint: each generation of the whole population has about 100 billion mutations. A few of these mutations may be beneficial, helping us adapt to—for example—living in high altitudes. The rest, some believe, can be potentially harmful and are making us prone to illness.

    Our species may be 200,000 years old but studies suggest that the majority of our current genetic variation (single nucleotide mutations) have occurred only in the past 5,000 years.

    (Via Discover)

     

     genetics  science 

  7. In an op-ed for the New York Times, actress Angelina Jolie writes about having preventive double mastectomy after finding out she had the BRCA1 gene mutation.

    In women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, the lifetime risk of breast cancer is increased about 55-85% and the lifetime risk of ovarian cancer is increased about 55% for BRCA1 and 30% for BRCA2. Testing is recommended for those with a strong family history of cancers such as ovarian and breast, especially if family members were diagnosed at an early age.

    The most effective way to reduce risk after finding one of these mutations is by doing surgery. Risk-reducing mastectomy reduces breast cancer risk in BRCA carriers by at least 95%. Risk-reducing bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy reduces breast cancer risk by 50% when done before menopause (breast cancers can “feed” on the hormones produced in the ovaries) and reduces ovarian/fallopian tube/peritoneal cancer risk by at least 80%.

    Studies suggest that less than half of women with BRCA mutations opt for mastectomy so Jolie’s article is a good way of bringing awareness to the situation.

     

     onclology  cancer  BRCA 

  8. We don’t live in the information age. That would be an insult to information, which, on some level, is supposed to inform. We live in the communication age. Ten billion fingers fumbling away, unautocorrecting e-mails, texts, and tweets; each one an opportunity to offend, alienate, aggrieve, all in public, and at light speed. The misinterpretation age.
    — Jonathan Nolan
     

     technology 

  9. I was very embarrassed when my canvases began to fetch high prices. I saw myself condemned to a future of nothing but Masterpieces.
    — Henri Matisse
     

     Henri Matisse  art 

  10. "Shadow over Boston" by Eric Drooker. The New Yorker’s cover for next week.

    "Shadow over Boston" by Eric Drooker. The New Yorker’s cover for next week.

     

     the new yorker